Bristol Channel Cutter "Angelsea" (Shanti)

Varnish

Hi all,
Back in March of 2009 I decided to try “Honey Teak” which is a 2 part varnish. Practical Sailor had done a test and found it to hold up well as much as 5 years out. They reported no loss of finish. Now I don’t know exactly how the “finish” part was defined. You can read the report here http://www.signaturefinish.com/fabula_practical_sailor.pdf (large download)

Anyway, I had to redo all the varnish on Shanti down here in the tropics. We usually only get about 6 months on a varnish job before we need to top coat it again. And that is with a 8 coat varnish job to begin with.

So I was anxious to use this new wonder product. Also a little apprehensive, as a failure would be difficult and time consuming to remove. Read my post about being “on the dock“. The Honey Teak was applied 28 months ago.

This is a 2 part 2 part system. It uses 2 different types of coats that are both 2 part. You first apply a 2 part undercoat. I did the recommended 2 coats of the first part. This first part has a strong brown tint to it (honey?). This is from all the UV inhibitors that are loaded in it. Then I applied 3 coats of the clear top coat. This was all done wet on wet, except for the change from undercoat to top coat.

The final finish looked GREAT! (note: planks are oiled)

March 2009

The finish Now at 28 months. Notice the reflection of the rope.

I did wait just a little too long to put on some maintenance coats. On the eyebrow (trim around cabin) I lost finish on the edge. So now I will have a few “dark” spots when I refinish. All I will be doing for maintenance is a light sand with a red 3M pad. Then 2 coats wet on wet.

The key here is to not wait to apply the “maintenece” coats. It’s easy to put off since you need to sand and varnish a surface that looks great. I should have done this back in March.

So in the end I got a solid 2 years out of this system. For the Caribbean that is GREAT!

Down side is the expense. But compared to how much labor you saveĀ I think it’s worth every penny.

Cheers, Gary