Bristol Channel Cutter "Angelsea" (Shanti)

The photos are in!

Hi all,

Took Shanti for a little shake down sail yesterday afternoon.

Observations:

Had to use the furling line to unfurl the sail. I could not unfurl it with the sheet. This is quit secure, but a bit more work as I have to control sheet and furling line at the same time.

 Even with the 1200# of tension on the setup, it furled in easy enough. But for some reason would only furl to the clew. Had to ease the halyard off a little to get some sheet wrapped around the furled sail.

 I will need to change the outhaul line for the traveler. There is more pressure transfered to it than I had hoped. It stretches to much. So the whole rig ends up sitting back a little more than I want.

 The new Lewmar bronze winch is gorgeous and works a treat! With friction in the setup, it is hard to get the full 1200# I planned on. I am seeing a little more sag than I would like, but only a little. Maybe if I eat my spinach I can get 1200#. The true test will be today as I race this afternoon. Then I will see how she how close to the wind she sails. didn’t do much tacking to weather yesterday to see.

Now for what you all have been waiting for…more pics!

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under sail, sail unfurled

under sail, sail unfurled

The setup

The setup

Control lines for traveler

Control lines for traveler

Furling line belayed back by the cockpit

Furling line belayed back by the cockpit

Cool little fairleads from Classic Marine, UK. Bronze and lignum vitae.

Cool little fairleads from Classic Marine, UK. Bronze and lignum vitae.

Detail of traveler and furler

Detail of traveler and furler

Furled sail, nice and tidey. No dead bodies rolled up in it.

Furled sail, nice and tidey. No dead bodies rolled up in it.

Detail

Detail

Closer  detail of Precourt furler. Very small, but rated at 3000# SWL and up to a 450sqft sail.

Closer detail of Precourt furler. Very small, but rated at 3000# SWL and up to a 450sqft sail.

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Just the traveler is eased here, not the halyard.

Just the traveler is eased here, not the halyard.

Ready to drop and deck and stow or change

Ready to drop on deck and stow or change

Shanti with her new hairdo ...shes such a girl!

Shanti with her new hairdo ...shes such a girl!

Yes, I know I need to do something for anchor/mooring lines. I don’t have an extra hole at the lower part of the cranse iron for a block to run them through.  An it’s very difficult to free drill stainless steel.  hmmm, working on that one.
That’s all for now…maybe a will get some more racing tonight, but I may have my hands full with a green crew. Will report back on the weatherly performance.
Cheers,  Gary

2 thoughts on “The photos are in!

  1. Stu Meisner

    Gary;
    That’s pretty interesting. I was referred to you by ben ericksen.

    If I was to make a spectra or similar luff for a previously hank on sail to hoist from spare jib halyard, what does it take to achieve tension comparable to a wire stay? Is a special halyard material and dedicated mast winch/ cleat arrangement necessary, or can one use the rope clutch and conventional halyard led aft to the cockpit? I would use it on a 70% high-clew blade jib and storm jib in up to 30 kts (and a drifter in lighter conditions) on a Nor’sea 27 with a 135 on a furler. The boat came with these great hank on sails I’d like to be able to use, and a sewn in luff “wire’ might be the easiest way.

    My original plan was to make an adjustable forestay that could reach either mid deck or just behind furling drum, but the position below mast top would involve cutting down the larger sails or needing two adjustable forestays and risking a foul in the furling gear up top. It would be easier to just attach the spare halyard and haul.
    Your experience would be appreciated.
    Stu, Channel Islands Marina, Oxnard CA

    1. Gary Felton Post author

      Hi Stu,
      Yes, you can lead your halyard anywhere. The main thing using a flying jib is stretch and luff sag. So you need a luff line with the least stretch, which is wire or even better the new synthetic lines like Dynex. You will also need a halyard with the least amount of stretch. I used New england Ropes Endura Braid. This has a Dyneema 75 core.

      You will also need a halyard winch and a 2 part halyard. I purchased a Lewmar 16st bronze self-tailer for the job. It is said that the average amount of force on a 10″ winch handle is 35lbs. So if you multiply the winch number (16) by the 35 you get 560. Now double that because of the 2 part purchase halyard and you get 1120. You want at least a thousand pounds of force on the headstay. 1200 is better. I feel with a little grunt I can get about 1500 on my halyard.

      Thats all you need are those elements. So if you already have a #16 winch or bigger, just add a high tech halyard rigged 2 to 1. Take the sails down to your sail maker and have him install Dyneema anti torque luff lines and your good to go! Just remember that where ever you attach the jib it has to be able to handle in excess of 1/2 a ton of load.

      I really think you will enjoy this kind of setup.
      Cheers,
      Gary